How to Write a Letter of Recommendation

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For some jobs, employers request written . They may even request them as part of the . In these cases, applicants need to submit recommendation letters (typically two or three) with their resume and cover letter. 

These letters of recommendation carry significant weight to their recipients. If you're asked to write one, it's important to include details that build a strong case for the applicant. (If you do not feel comfortable endorsing the applicant, it's better to decline to write a letter than to write something lukewarm.) 

Here's what you need to know to write an effective letter supporting a job applicant. 

Consider What Type of Letter You're Writing 

If you’re asked to provide a , you should write the letter with the requirements of that particular job in mind. Read the posting or job description carefully, looking for specific skills and knowledge that you can include in the letter for your candidate. In your letter, note where there is a match between the applicant's qualifications and the job's responsibilities. 

With a , focus on the types or category of jobs for which the person is applying. Your examples in this type of letter will be more broad, and less specific. 

Collect Information Before You Start

Ask the person for whom you are writing to supply you with a copy of the job posting and their  or  (CV) before you begin composing your letter. It can also be helpful to review their cover letter to see how they pitch their qualifications for the job.

When you are writing a more general recommendation, ask the subject of your letter to outline their targets for employment. Ask them for an example or two of jobs they are applying for. Also ask them to share their most marketable assets for that type of work, especially ones you may have observed in your relationship with the person you are recommending.

The more information you have about the jobs or types of jobs the candidate is applying for, the more effective your recommendation can be.

What to Include in a Recommendation Letter

The first paragraph of your letter should explain how you know the person for whom you are writing. Reference your job title and the individual's job title at the time when you interacted, as well as the nature of your relationship, including whether you supervised the person you're recommending.

Typically, you would also include the length of time you have known the person. 

Body of the Letter

The body of your letter should reference the , qualities, areas of knowledge, and other assets of the person you are recommending. Start by making a list of the  which you would like to convey in your recommendation.

Then compose sentences that show proof of your assertions — this will make your letter more credible. Provide specific examples of instances where you observed the candidate using skills they are highlighting to the hiring manager.

This might consist of a project or role where they successfully applied a certain skill. Citing accomplishments where value was added to your organization and describing the strengths which enabled the person to generate those results can be particularly compelling.

Here's more. 

Letter Closing

In your closing statement, it can be very effective to mention that you would hire the person again. Or, mention your belief that the person would be an outstanding addition to the company.

Share Your Contact Information

As part of your close, you can also share a telephone number and email address with a mention of your eagerness to share additional perspective on the candidate. That way, potential employers can easily get in touch if they have any follow-up questions. 

Employment Recommendation Letter Example

Megan Greene
Sales Director
XYZ Incorporated
14 Oak Drive
Anycity, CT 32444
555-222-3333
mgreene@email.com 

April 8, 20XX

Marlene Gray
Domestic Sales Manager
CBI Industries
321 Main Street
Bigtown, NY 12000

Dear Ms. Gray,

I am writing to you regarding Mark Slade, who has applied for the position of sales associate with your company. Mark has worked in my department as a sales associate since graduating with honors last year from University of Connecticut. We hired him after graduation in part due to his outstanding performance as an intern the previous summer.

Mark has been a fantastic addition to my team. He assimilated easily into our department, quickly and thoroughly learning about all of our products, not just those he was responsible for selling. His enthusiasm for his work and his superb communication skills made him an instant asset to the company. Mark exceeded his personal goals for every quarter and even made time to help his peers close particularly difficult sales. Mark is competent and organized, and his positive attitude and sense of humor made him popular among our customers as well as his colleagues.

I believe that Mark has a tremendous amount of potential and would be an outstanding addition to your staff. I would have no reservations about hiring him again and am confident in recommending Mark for employment with your company. If you have any further questions or would like to speak with me personally, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,

Your Handwritten Signature (for a hard copy letter)

Megan Greene

Formatting Your Letter

Here are guidelines for  including length, format, font, and how to organize your letters. If this is your first time writing a letter of recommendation, you may find it helpful to use a . 

Sending Your Letter

You may be asked to send the letter to the person you are recommending or directly to the employer. If you’re sending via email, attach a copy of your letter to the email message as a PDF or Microsoft Word document.  or the employer will typically specify how the recommendation should be sent and who it should be sent to.

Review More Recommendation Letter Samples

Not sure what to write? Review more , including letters for employment,  of recommendation, and character and personal reference letters.

When You Can’t Write a Positive Recommendation

If you have difficulty honestly framing a compelling letter for a candidate, then it's fine to decline the request. It's actually better to say no than it is to write a letter that doesn't strongly endorse the person you are recommending.

You can simply say something vague like you don't feel totally comfortable writing a recommendation or you don't have the type of exposure that would enable you to supply the right kind of letter. Here’s how to .