High School Resume Examples and Writing Tips

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Writing a resume when you're a high school student who doesn't have much – or any – prior work experience can seem daunting.

Here's the good news: You probably have more information to put on your resume than you think. Experiences like babysitting, lawn mowing, and volunteering all help to show valuable work skills that employers want to see. Just because you haven’t had a job like the one you are applying for, doesn’t mean you haven’t acquired the skills necessary to succeed.

A good way to get started on your resume as a high school student is to look at examples of resumes and read tips on what to include and how to format your resume.

High School Student Resume Examples

Review resume samples to get a sense of what the final version of your resume should look like. The examples below are written especially for high school students.

Use these examples as a starting point when creating your own resume. You don't want to copy the content within these resumes (the job titles and job descriptions) — just the format

Resume Templates

Especially for a first resume, using a template is a good idea. Not only will it save you time, but it can reduce formatting errors. Here are two template options to consider: 

Resume Writing Tips for High School Students

Here’s how to get started and what to include on your resume in addition to, or instead of, formal work experience.

Make an Outline. Make a quick list or outline of all possible experiences, paid and unpaid, to include in your resume before you try to find the right language to describe them.

Think of this as a brainstorming step and try to jot down as much down as you can.

Include Informal Work Experience. If you have formal paid work experience, certainly include it. Otherwise, you can include informal work like babysitting, pet sitting, lawn mowing, shoveling snow, or anything else you've done to earn money. Even if you didn't collect a regular paycheck, informal work still displays skills and your reliability as an employee. 

Include All Your Activities. Since most high school students haven't held a lot of jobs, it is important to draw upon all aspects of your life that show you have the right character, work ethic, skills, and personality to succeed in a job. Mention your extracurricular activities, volunteer work, academics, and athletic pursuits. 

If you held any sort of leadership positions in these roles (such as secretary of a club or team captain), be sure to note this. For each item, include a bulleted list of your responsibilities and accomplishments.

Promote Your Attitude and Performance. Employers will be most interested in your work habits and attitude. They don't expect you to have a lot of experience. If you have perfect or near perfect attendance and are punctual for school and other commitments, you might include language like "Compiled a perfect (or near perfect) record for attendance" when describing an experience.

 

If supervisors, teachers, or coaches have recognized you for a positive attitude or outstanding service, mention it in your description of the activity.

Mention Your Achievements. Employers look for staff who have a history of making positive contributions. Review each of your experiences and ask yourself if there are achievements in class, clubs, sports, or the workplace that you can include. If so, use verbs like enhanced, reorganized, increased, improved, initiated, upgraded, or expanded to show what you accomplished. Include any challenging advanced academic projects since this shows employers that you are intelligent and a hard worker.

Include Resume Skills. It's always a good idea to include skills related to the jobs for which you are applying. Here are examples of skills to include on your resume.

You probably have many skills that you can include that you acquired in school, sports, youth groups, extra-curricular activities, or volunteering.

Use Action Verbs. Use active language when describing your experiences, so you are portrayed in a dynamic way. Start the phrases in your descriptions with action verbs like organized, led, calculated, taught, served, trained, tutored, wrote, researched, inventoried, created, designed, drafted, and edited.

Keep it Short and Include All Necessary Information. Your resume doesn't need to be any longer than a page. Some sections of the resume — such as contact information and experience — are required. But others — such as an objective or career summary — are optional. Here's a list of examples of each part of a resume.

Proofread Your Draft. Review your draft very carefully before finalizing your document and make sure there are no spelling or grammatical errors. Ask your guidance counselor, parents, or a favorite teacher to critique your resume. Here's how to proofread your resume.

Where to Print Copies. If you don't have a printer at home, check with your school guidance office or local library to see if they have a printer you can use.

Get Started: How to Build a Resume in 7 Easy Steps | Tips for Writing Your First Resume