U.S. Army Weight Charts

Weight charts and body fat percentages for male and female soldiers

Woman measuring waist using tape measure, mid section
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The Army Body Composition Program (formerly the Weight Control Program - WCP) requires Army personnel to maintain a certain body weight and fat percentage. Having reasonable weight and fitness standards helps soldiers handle the demands of their work in the field and reduces injury rates during training cycles and deployments. 

Oftentimes body composition issues can affect the attitude and morale of the individual soldier and the unit to which he or she belongs. Soldiers are weighed at least twice per year (usually in conjunction with the , to ensure they meet Army standards for weight and fitness.

Exceeding Army Body Fat Standards

Soldiers who exceed the maximum weight shown on the charts below during an exam will be measured for body-fat content. If they exceed the Army's body fat standards, they'll be put on a weight management program, which provides guidance to lose weight at a healthy pace. 

Those who fail to make satisfactory progress while in the weight management program may be subject to involuntary discharge.

If you fall below the minimum weight shown in that column of the table, you will be referred by your commander for immediate medical evaluation. If possible, it's best to try to get into top physical shape before joining the Army or other branches of the U.S. military, making it easier to stay fit, rather than always trying to just meet the minimum standards. The standards are different for and women.

Male Weight to Height Table - Screening Table Weight

Height (inches) Weight (pounds) Age 17-20 Age 21-27 Age 28-39 Age 40+
58 91 - - - -
59 94 - - - -
60 97 132 136 139 141
61 100 136 140 144 146
62 104 141 144 148 150
63 107 145 149 153 155
64 110 150 154 158 160
65 114 155 159 163 165
66 117 160 163 168 170
67 121 165 169 174 176
68 125 170 174 179 181
69 128 175 179 184 186
70 132 180 185 189 192
71 136 185 189 194 197
72 140 190 195 200 203
73 144 195 200 205 208
74 148 201 206 211 214
75 152 206 212 217 220
76 156 212 217 223 226
77 160 218 223 229 232
78 164 223 229 235 238
79 168 229 235 241 244
80 173 234 240 247 250

For heights over 80 inches, add six pounds per inch for males.

Army Maximum Body Fat Standards for Men

Age 17-20 = 20 percent
Age 21-27 = 22 percent
Age 28-39 = 24 percent
Age 40+ = 26 percent

Female Weight to Height Table - Screening Table Weight

Weight (pounds) Height (inches) Age 17-20 Age 21-27 Age 28-39 Age 40 plus
58 91 119 121 122 123
59 94 124 125 126 128
60 97 128 129 131 133
61 100 132 134 135 137
62 104 136 138 140 142
63 107 141 143 144 146
64 110 145 147 149 151
65 114 150 152 154 156
66 117 155 156 158 161
67 121 159 161 163 166
68 125 164 166 168 171
69 128 169 171 173 176
70 132 174 176 178 181
71 136 179 181 183 186
72 140 184 186 188 191
73 144 189 191 194 197
74 148 194 197 199 202
75 152 200 202 204 208
76 156 205 207 210 213
77 160 210 213 215 219
78 164 216 218 221 225
79 168 221 224 227 230

For heights over 80 inches, add five pounds per inch for females.

Army Maximum Body Fat Standards for Women

Age 17-20 = 30 percent
Age 21-27 = 32 percent
Age 28-39 = 34 percent
Age 40+ = 36 percent

Staying Fit in the Army

Keeping within height and weight standards of the Army are mandatory for all and reserve soldiers. For most Army jobs there's enough physical activity involved to ensure that a soldier's weight and body fat composition stays low, but for those assigned to desk duty, it's best to get into a regular physical regimen to avoid putting on extra unwanted pounds.

The Army does not allow individual soldiers to have poor body composition for a prolonged period of time, as it may cause disruption to his unit. 

For the individual soldier who is overweight, performance declines and the risk of developing work-related injury increases. They're also at higher risk of long-term disease. 

Graduate rates from are also tied to similar statistics also yielding a greater chance of injury and failure to complete training.